Eating eggs increases the risk of heart disease

Alicia Farmer
March 16, 2019

The findings stand in contrast to past studies that suggested cholesterol had little to no association with heart disease, and that saturated fat carried the greatest risk, Lauri Wright, spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, who did not work on the study, told Newsweek.

Dr. Frank Hu of Harvard University noted that most previous studies have shown that eating a few eggs weekly is not linked with risks for heart disease in generally healthy people. And each additional half an egg consumed per day was associated with a 1.1% higher risk of cardiovascular disease and 1.9% higher risk of early death due to any cause, they found.

USA dietary guidelines that eased limits on cholesterol have helped eggs make a comeback. However, consumption has surged in the past decade as...

Researchers believed eggs could be the key to reducing strokes because they contain not only dietary cholesterol, but also high-quality protein, an array of vitamins and bioactive components including phospholipids and carotenoids.

The results from this latest study are a stark contrast from research released past year which found eating an egg a day could do wonders for your health.

The researchers controlled the data to account for other foods in the diet, so while that pile of bacon on your breakfast plate may be a problem, it doesn't exonerate the eggs.

The new findings contradict the latest dietary guidelines for Americans, released in 2015; in them, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) said that Americans no longer had to worry about keeping their cholesterol intake within a certain limit.

But more recent dietary guidelines have loosened the reins on dietary cholesterol. Some people only ate egg whites.

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"We want to remind people there is cholesterol in eggs, specifically yolks, and this has a harmful effect", said Allen, who mentioned that she still cooks scrambled eggs for her children.

Basically, it all boils down to this: Eggs - in moderation - can be part of a healthy diet. Even the researchers who worked on the study aren't happy about it.

So, is there a simple answer to whether you should be eating eggs or not?

"The fact that studies outside the USA appear to show favorable relationships with egg intake and cardiovascular risk may speak to the importance of what other foods are consumed with eggs as part of the overall diet pattern, as recent research has demonstrated the importance of separating eggs from other foods to understand their independent impact on health outcomes", Rubin said in a statement. Well, it depends on how many you eat a day. "It is nice to get clearer data on this controversial topic to better inform future guidelines and our patients", Martin said of the new study.

A new, large study may serve up some confusing advice for egg lovers.

"Eggs are a good staple. There are a lot of other nutrients in the yolks as well", Sacchi added.

"Eggs are a nutritious food and, while this study focuses on the amount we're eating, it's just as important to pay attention to how the eggs are cooked and to the trimmings that come with them", said Taylor, who was not involved in the research.

The study was published Friday in the journal JAMA.

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