Shiva Singh hogs the limelight with his 360-degree bowling run-up

Aubrey Yates
November 9, 2018

Uttar Pradesh's young left arm spinner Shiva Singh's unconventional delivery stride with a 360-degree rotation during a CK Nayudu Trophy match against Bengal was called a dead ball by the umpires but his freakish move did generate a lot of discussion. However, what must be noted here is that bowler did not switch his bowling arm. He was recently involved in the C.K Nayudu Trophy encounter as UP faced off against the Bengal. The umpires had intervened when he tried to bowl with the 360-degree turn and called it a dead ball.

The law says "Either umpire shall call and signal Dead ball when ... there is an instance of a deliberate attempt to distract under either of Laws 41.4 (Deliberate attempt to distract striker) or 41.5 (Deliberate distraction, deception or obstruction of batsman)". The match is being played at the Bengal Cricket Academy ground at Kalyani.

But former England captain Michael Vaughan had a completely different take, saying he had no issues against the action.

As per section 4 of Law 42 (Fair and Unfair Play), "It is unfair for any fielder deliberately to attempt to distract the striker while he is preparing to receive or receiving a delivery".

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Sing created a media storm when he turned 360 degrees before delivering the ball, while playing in an under-23 tournament for Uttar Pradesh.

"This is particularly so if there was no apparent advantage to be gained from the twirl, unlike, for example, the bowler varying the width of the release point or the length of his/her run-up, which are entirely lawful".

Paige Cordona asked - 'if batsmen can reverse sweep, what's stopping a bowler from doing that?

"If you were going to do it every ball, it might be a different story, but when it's a one-off, I think that makes it a bit too hard - I don't really think that's in the spirit of the game".

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