NASA Spots Galaxies In Form Of Smiley

Olive Hawkins
November 8, 2018

NASA has released the photo of distant galaxies seemingly smiling back to the observatory. WFC3 is able to view distant galaxies at an unprecedented resolution - high enough to locate and study regions of star formation within them.

On Saturday, it posted an image on its Instagram handle that showed two yellow orbs above an arc of light - painting a smiley face in space.

The sweeping arc of light that makes up the mouth appears to be pulled out of shape due to the strong gravitational forces distorting its light.

But the "smile" is actually evidence of a phenomenon known as "gravitational lensing" - wherelight is "bent" by the gravity of massive objects in the foreground on its way towards us. Because of its position, the space telescope can see and capture the effect, which cannot be detected by ground-based observatories.

U.S. mail bomb suspect agrees to be held without bail
Just days after CNN was sent a mail bomb, Trump tweeted that the "fake news media" are the "true enemy of the people". Sayoc's lawyers have found it in his best interest to have the hearing in NY instead of staying in Miami .

Dems gain House; GOP retains Senate
In suburban areas where key House races will be decided, voters skewed significantly toward Democrats by a almost 10-point margin. Democrats could derail Trump's legislative agenda for the next two years should they win control of the House or the Senate.

Hackers Impersonate Elon Musk Using Verified Twitter Accounts to Spread Bitcoin Scam
The hacker promised to double the investment of anyone who sends a small amount of Bitcoin to the specified wallet. Pathe UK have since issued a statement to confirm that their account was "hacked by an unknown third party".

A cluster of galaxies that look like a smiling face has been spotted by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. The lifetime of the young stars is very small in astronomical terms - just a few million years.

NASA hopes to analyze the luminosity, the size, and the rate of formation of stars in different stellar nurseries from various points in time throughout the universe.

Hubble Space Telescope returned to normal operations on October 26 after successfully recovering a backup gyroscope that had replaced a failed one three weeks earlier. For two weeks, the space observatory had been placed into safe mode as engineers figured out their next step of action.

With the assistance of the powerful Hubble telescope, the Terrans got a unusual space news.

Other reports by

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER