Mega-Shark Teeth Of 25-Million-Year-Old Found On Australian Beach

Olive Hawkins
August 12, 2018

Some belonged to other species of shark, but a shocking number of them belong to the Carcharocles angustidens. A cousin of the famous megalodon, this huge shark would have measured over 30 feet in length - aka, twice the length of a great white shark. During two expeditions taking place last December and January, Fitzgerald led a team of experts to the location where Mullaly found the teeth to excavate.

Senior curator of vertebrate paleontology of the Museum Victoria Erich Fitzgerald confirmed that inches the teeth belong to the extinct predator known as the ' great escosura toothed shark (angustidens Carcharocle).

"I was immediately excited, it was just ideal and I knew it was an important find that needed to be shared with people". Even more exciting, the teeth are still largely intact, despite being 25 million years old.

Fossil enthusiast and school teacher Philip Mullaly discovered the rare pair, which are the first of their kind found in Australia and one of only three discoveries in the world.

Fitzgerald said he was first contacted by Mullaly previous year about a different discovery, during which he briefly mentioned the find at Jan Juc, but it wasn't until the amateur fossil hunter brought the teeth into the museum that Fitzgerald realized how significant the discovery was.

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Among the treasure trove of megashark teeth, the team also found prehistoric teeth belonging to a sixgill shark, which is a bottom-feeding scavenger that still swims off the coasts of Australia today.

The recently found fossilized mega-shark teeth were dated 25-million-year-old and are now on display at the Melbourne Museum until October 7th. Although the team found evidence that there was only one megashark there, they found indications that there were several different sixgill sharks on the scene.

"These teeth are of worldwide significance, as they represent one of just three associated groupings of Carcharocles angustidens teeth in the world", Fitzgerald explained.

"Angustidens was a bloody big shark, we're talking more than 30 feet long", Fitzgerald said.

"This find suggests they have performed that lifestyle here for tens of millions of years", Museums Victoria paleontologist Tim Ziegler said.

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