UK PM May faces backlash over treatment of 'Windrush generation' of migrants

Alicia Farmer
April 16, 2018

Thousands of Windrush migrants who arrived in the United Kingdom after World War II are being threatened with deportation amid rule changes.

Mrs May's official spokesman said: "She deeply values the contribution made by these and all Commonwealth citizens who have made a life in the United Kingdom, and is making sure the Home Office is offering the correct solution for individual situations".

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn tweeted it was "disgraceful" that the rights of the Windrush generation had been brought into question, calling on Mrs May to "answer serious questions about how this had happened on her watch".

But, despite having lived in the country for the majority of their lives, the group of British residents have begun to experience issues as a result of tightened United Kingdom immigration requirements.

But the majority arrived to Britain on parents' passports and never applied for travel documents.

Their problems include difficulties when finding work, getting NHS care, accessing benefits, or trying to secure housing.

Parliament will consider debating the immigration status of members of the "Windrush Generation" after a petition received a huge wave of support.

She told Channel 4 News: "Potentially they have been and I'm very conscious that it's very much in error, and that's an error that I want to put right".

"We will handle every case with sensitivity and will help people understand what is required and help them gather the information they need". Forced to appear before MPs in the House of Commons, Home Secretary Amber Rudd apologized for the "appalling" treatment of some of the Windrush migrants and promised that none of them would be deported for lack of documentation.

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In recent years, however, changes to United Kingdom immigration law have caused significant problems for many of them.

Shadow home secretary Diane Abbott demanded an apology from Theresa May over the problems faced by Windrush generation residents.

Home Office Immigration Minister Caroline Nokes said: "I know that there is a growing sense of anxiety among some people in the Windrush generation".

"The Windrush generation must have their rights as British citizens confirmed, any who have been deported must be invited back to the United Kingdom immediately and those who oversaw their deportations must be held to account".

Downing Street said that no meeting had been scheduled but said that there would be "a number of opportunities" for Commonwealth leaders to meet PM Theresa May and discuss this "important issue".

Mrs May's official spokesman said the PM was clear that nobody with a right to be in the United Kingdom would be made to leave.

Guy Hewitt, the Barbados high commissioner, said: "We did make a request to the CHOGM summit team for a meeting to be held between the prime minister and the Commonwealth Caribbean heads of government who will be here for the CHOGM and regrettably they have advised us that that is not possible".

Downing Street had refused a request from the high commissioners of 12 Caribbean nations for a meeting as it emerged that large numbers of people were being threatened with deportation, denied access to healthcare, lost jobs or been made homeless because they do not have sufficient paperwork to prove they have the right to be in the UK.

Mrs May's official spokesman said: "She deeply values the contribution made by these and all Commonwealth citizens who have made a life in the United Kingdom, and is making sure the Home Office is offering the correct solution for individual situations".

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