Night Owls are at Higher Risk of Earlier Death

Alicia Farmer
Апреля 12, 2018

After controlling for age and sex, smoking, body mass index, sleep duration and other variables, they found that compared with "definite morning" types, "definite evening" types had a 10 percent increased risk of dying from any cause.

"We should discuss allowing evening types to start and finish work later, where practical". Make work shifts match peoples' chronotypes.

Late sleepers and late "wakers" are likelier to die younger than those who rise and set with the Sun, study shows.

Evening people were at greater risk for certain health conditions, including diabetes, psychological disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, neurological disorders and respiratory conditions, the study found.

The association was strongest for psychological disorders: Those who identified as "definite evening types" were almost twice as likely to report having a psychological illness than those who were "definite morning types", the study found. Earlier studies have already found higher rates of metabolic problems and cardiovascular diseases in people who are active at night.

'And we need more research about how we can help evening types cope with the higher effort of keeping their body clock in synchrony with sun time.

Owls may have a body clock that fails to match their external environment, said Dr Knutson.

She went on to reveal that "It could be psychological stress, eating at the wrong time for the body, not exercising enough, not sleeping enough, being awake at night by yourself, maybe drug or alcohol use".

Genetics and the environment played roughly equal roles in determining whether you are a night or morning person, said the scientists.

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Those behind the research said society needed to wake up to the difficulties faced by night owls and called on employers to be more flexible towards staff who suffer when forced to clock in early.

Although the reasons for their increased mortality remain unclear, she said, "Night owls should know that there may be some health consequences".

"If we can recognize these chronotypes are‚ in part‚ genetically determined and not just a character flaw‚ jobs and work hours could have more flexibility for owls‚" she said.

"They shouldn't be forced to get up for an 8am shift".

More than 430,000 people were studied in the research.

'I think we need to seriously consider whether the suggested benefits outweigh these risks'.

The participants had defined themselves as either "definitely a morning person" (27 percent), "more a morning person than evening person" (35 percent), "more an evening than a morning person" (28 percent), or "definitely an evening person" (nine percent).

To reach their findings, researchers examined data from 433,268 people who took part in an earlier British study that examined the risk factors for different diseases in people aged 37 to 73.

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